moment of truth: kavanaugh and ford

A Vice News Tonight special report on the testimonies of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford and Judge Brett Kavanaugh.


TED CRUZ ISN’T SCARED OF BETO O’ROURKE — BUT HE ISN’T TAKING ANY CHANCES

Senator Ted Cruz is not assuming anything in his campaign for re-election. He’s a popular politician in a state that hasn’t sent a Democrat to the senate in 25 years. But polls show him in a surprisingly tight race with the young, telegenic upstart Beto O’Rourke, who’s captivated liberal crowds in Texas, and celebrity endorsements across the nation.


The Farmers Fighting Rural America's Mental Health Crisis

One night in 1992, farmer Jeff Ditzenberger walked into an abandoned house near his farm in Monroe, Wisconsin and lit it on fire. He had no intention of walking out alive. But as the walls caught fire around him, he changed his mind. And he walked out.


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This Florida bill could restrict guns from dangerous owners

Florida is one of more than a dozen states considering a law that would allow authorities to seize guns before potentially violent people carry out attacks. 


Freezing classrooms spark heated debate over Baltimore’s school infrastructure

Baltimore City Public Schools faced outrage from parents after images emerged of students wearing coats in a freezing classroom. More than a third of schools reported a lack of heat this winter during a cold snap, and that’s just one of the many problems plaguing the school system’s crumbling infrastructure, underscoring a larger debate about long-term funding and investment. 


What happens to learning when students get much-needed glasses

Good vision care is a luxury for families who can't easily afford the time or money spent getting a child's first pair of glasses. But a new program called Vision for Baltimore provides eye exams and two pairs of glasses to every student who needs them, totally free of charge -- a simple thing that can dramatically improve the quality of their education. 


white nationalists see violent charlottesville rally as successful turning point

The national fallout continues after three people died and multiple people were injured in the chaos of a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Saturday. The NewsHour's PJ Tobia and Mark Scialla join Hari Sreenivasan to discuss why many see the rally as a turning point, as well as to offer a look at the "antifa" counter-protesters. 


WHITE NATIONALIST RALLY IN CHARLOTTESVILLE ENDS IN DEATH OF ANTI-FASCIST ACTIVIST

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe declared a state of emergency in Charlottesville on Saturday as hundreds of white nationalists and alt-right activists clashed with police and counter-protesters. It was the second rally to protest the city's plan to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from Emancipation Park.


activists occupy the trees to stop a Pennsylvania pipeline

Hearing chainsaw motors revving in the woods behind her southern Pennsylvania home, Elise Gerhart climbed a white pine 40-feet high. Cutting that tree would have brought her down with it. 


Nature knows no borders. Border security can take a heavy toll on endangered wildlife

One of President Trump's key promises rests on building a wall across the U.S.-Mexico border. But how would a continuous barrier stretching from California to Texas affect the wildlife that live there? At least 50 species near the border are already endangered and scientists worry a wall will only accelerate extinction for some. 


inside a far-right militia's training camp

Armed militias have long been active on the fringes of American society and continue to rise today. 


How increased security affects life for border residents

In a sleepy, no-stoplight town 25 miles from the Arizona-Mexico border, you'll pass surveillance towers, border agents on patrol and checkpoints. This is life along the border, where security has ramped up significantly since 9/11, sweeping up American citizens in its wake. 


ANTI-TRUMP PROTESTS BREAK OUT ACROSS D.C.

While many people ventured to the National Mall on Friday to cheer the new president, other groups were not so celebratory. Protests erupted across Washington, D.C., as opponents of President Trump expressed their disapproval, sometimes clashing chaotically with police and leaving damage in their wake. Jeffrey Brown reports. 


New pipeline clashes call on Standing Rock playbook

Near the small town of Marfa, Texas, a consortium led by Energy Transfer Partners is building the 148-mile Trans-Pecos Pipeline, which will cross under the Rio Grande to bring fracked natural gas to markets in Mexico. A group inspired by the Standing Rock movement is planning a new fight against the company building that pipeline. 


China’s ivory ban opens questions about its massive legal stockpiles

On the surface, complete ban of ivory sales seems to fulfill a 2015 pledge made with the U.S. to end the ivory trade. But so far, Beijing hasn't released details on what will happen with the nation's massive legal and illegal stockpiles.


How a white nationalist leader wants to go mainstream with his racist movement

With the election of Donald Trump, racist groups of all stripes are hoping their message will be more widely accepted. But will they actually go mainstream? The NewsHour's PJ Tobia sits down with Richard Spencer, a leader of the so-called "alt-right" -- a mix of white nationalism, neo-Nazi beliefs and hard-edged populism -- who has energized a tiny group of passionate followers. 


For these college students, the most difficult test may be basic survival

The biggest challenge for these college students may not be exams or papers, but finding the means to survive. While the University of California system has worked to bring in more first-generation and "non-traditional" students, helping them stay, succeed and meet basic needs like getting enough food requires greater investment. 


tribes across north America converge at standing rock, hoping to be heard

Protesters of the North Dakota pipeline celebrated after the Department of Justice temporarily halted the project in federal jurisdictions last Friday. But while some equipment sits idle, construction in other areas continues. William Brangham visits the Standing Rock Reservation, where more than 100 Native American tribes have gathered, to recap a week of protests. 


Tribe will have to wait on Dakota Access Pipeline fate

At least 300 people opposed to a controversial oil pipeline under construction in North Dakota waited anxiously outside a D.C. federal courthouse this afternoon for a decision on whether or not the project can to continue. And now they’ll have to wait just a little longer. 


What are PFAs, the toxic chemicals being found in drinking water?

More than 16 million Americans drink water contaminated with toxic chemicals that can be traced to military and industrial sites, according to new research from Harvard University. 


It could take centuries for EPA to test all the unregulated chemicals under a new landmark bill

The first major overhaul in 40 years to toxic chemical rules doesn’t mean regulation will be swift. 


here's what you can buy to Celebrate New Year in Vietnam: Bear Paw, Pangolin, and Snake Wine

As the Tet holiday gets underway, the country's wealthy and growing middle class are consuming products made from endangered species, despite a ban and stricter law enforcement. 


ELECTRIC FISHING PUTS A RARE DOLPHIN-HUMAN PARTNERSHIP AT RISK

Illegal fishing practices are threatening traditional cooperation between humans and river dolphins in Burma. 


WHY JOURNALISTS CARRY GUNS IN THE PHILIPPINES

The Philippines is one of the most dangerous countries in which to be a journalist, with at least 75 killed since 1992, and most murders remaining unsolved. Now, some journalists are arming themselves. 


CLIMATE CHANGE BLAMED FOR SEVERE DROUGHT HITTING VIETNAM'S COFFEE CROPS

Exports drop 40% as world's second-biggest coffee exporter suffers rising temperatures and drought, combined with effects of deforestation, land degradation and depleted water resources caused by decades of growth. 


MEET THE MEKONG DELTA FARMERS WHO ARE ON THE FRONT LINES OF SEA LEVEL RISE

Prolonged dry seasons and sea level rise, brought about by climate change, are pushing saltwater deeper inland, threatening food security and livelihoods for millions in the Mekong Delta. 


GETTING AID TO NEPAL'S DESPERATE QUAKE VICTIMS

In villages where the government has yet to provide supplies, a group of friends has stepped up to fill the void.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           


'I THOUGHT IT WAS A DREAM': NEPAL QUAKE SURVIVOR RECALLS MOMENT DISASTER STRUCK

Pemba Tamang, 15, survived 120 hours under rubble relatively unscathed. But as rescuers reach more survivors, space for new hospital patients could become scarce as damaged infrastructure renders operating theaters unsafe. 


ARKANSAS: THE WORST PLACE TO RENT IN AMERICA

Arkansas is the only state in the US where tenants are treated as criminals for paying rent late, and landlords are not required to maintain their properties.