pbs newshour

The PBS NewsHour is a nationally acclaimed evening newscast from Washington, D.C. 

Freezing classrooms spark heated debate over Baltimore’s school infrastructure

Baltimore City Public Schools faced outrage from parents after images emerged of students wearing coats in a freezing classroom. More than a third of schools reported a lack of heat this winter during a cold snap, and that’s just one of the many problems plaguing the school system’s crumbling infrastructure, underscoring a larger debate about long-term funding and investment. - FEB. 13, 2018

Credits: Producer / Cinematographer


WHAT HAPPENS TO LEARNING WHEN STUDENTS GET MUCH-NEEDED GLASSES

Good vision care is a luxury for families who can't easily afford the time or money spent getting a child's first pair of glasses. But a new program called Vision for Baltimore provides eye exams and two pairs of glasses to every student who needs them, totally free of charge -- a simple thing that can dramatically improve the quality of their education. - DEC. 19, 2017

Credits: Producer / Cinematographer


WHITE NATIONALISTS SEE VIOLENT CHARLOTTESVILLE RALLY AS SUCCESSFUL TURNING POINT

The national fallout continues after three people died and multiple people were injured in the chaos of a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Saturday. The NewsHour's PJ Tobia and Mark Scialla join Hari Sreenivasan to discuss why many see the rally as a turning point, as well as to offer a look at the "antifa" counter-protesters. - AUG. 14, 2017

Credits: Producer / Cinematographer


WHITE NATIONALIST RALLY IN CHARLOTTESVILLE ENDS IN DEATH OF ANTI-FASCIST ACTIVIST

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe declared a state of emergency in Charlottesville on Saturday as hundreds of white nationalists and alt-right activists clashed with police and counter-protesters. It was the second rally to protest the city's plan to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from Emancipation Park.- AUG. 12, 2017

Credits: Producer / Cinematographer


NATURE KNOWS NO BORDERS. BORDER SECURITY CAN TAKE A HEAVY TOLL ON ENDANGERED WILDLIFE

One of President Trump's key promises rests on building a wall across the U.S.-Mexico border. But how would a continuous barrier stretching from California to Texas affect the wildlife that live there? At least 50 species near the border are already endangered and scientists worry a wall will only accelerate extinction for some. - APRIL 26, 2017

Credits: Producer / Cinematographer


INSIDE A FAR-RIGHT MILITIA'S TRAINING CAMP

Armed militias have long been active on the fringes of American society and continue to rise today. - APRIL 19, 2017

Credits: Producer / Cinematographer


HOW INCREASED SECURITY AFFECTS LIFE FOR BORDER RESIDENTS

In a sleepy, no-stoplight town 25 miles from the Arizona-Mexico border, you'll pass surveillance towers, border agents on patrol and checkpoints. This is life along the border, where security has ramped up significantly since 9/11, sweeping up American citizens in its wake. - MARCH 28, 2017

Credits: Producer / Cinematographer


ANTI-TRUMP PROTESTS BREAK OUT ACROSS D.C.

While many people ventured to the National Mall on Friday to cheer the new president, other groups were not so celebratory. Protests erupted across Washington, D.C., as opponents of President Trump expressed their disapproval, sometimes clashing chaotically with police and leaving damage in their wake. Jeffrey Brown reports. - JAN. 20, 2017

Credits: Producer


HOW A WHITE NATIONALIST LEADER WANTS TO GO MAINSTREAM WITH HIS RACIST MOVEMENT

With the election of Donald Trump, racist groups of all stripes are hoping their message will be more widely accepted. But will they actually go mainstream? The NewsHour's PJ Tobia sits down with Richard Spencer, a leader of the so-called "alt-right" -- a mix of white nationalism, neo-Nazi beliefs and hard-edged populism -- who has energized a tiny group of passionate followers. - DEC. 14, 2016

Credits: Field Producer / B - Camera


FOR THESE COLLEGE STUDENTS, THE MOST DIFFICULT TEST MAY BE BASIC SURVIVAL

The biggest challenge for these college students may not be exams or papers, but finding the means to survive. While the University of California system has worked to bring in more first-generation and "non-traditional" students, helping them stay, succeed and meet basic needs like getting enough food requires greater investment. - OCT. 25, 2016

Credits: Producer


TRIBES ACROSS NORTH AMERICA CONVERGE AT STANDING ROCK, HOPING TO BE HEARD

Protesters of the North Dakota pipeline celebrated after the Department of Justice temporarily halted the project in federal jurisdictions last Friday. But while some equipment sits idle, construction in other areas continues. William Brangham visits the Standing Rock Reservation, where more than 100 Native American tribes have gathered, to recap a week of protests. - SEPT. 16, 2016

Credits: Producer


Smithsonian Magazine

The Smithsonian Magazine is published by the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.  

ELECTRIC FISHING PUTS A RARE DOLPHIN-HUMAN PARTNERSHIP AT RISK

Illegal fishing practices are threatening traditional cooperation between humans and river dolphins in Burma. - SEPT. 22, 2015

Credits:Cinematographer, writer


The guardian

The Guardian is a leading UK newspaper.

Why journalists carry guns in the Philippines

The Philippines is one of the most dangerous countries in which to be a journalist, with at least 75 killed since 1992, and most murders remaining unsolved. Now, some journalists are arming themselves. - AUG. 24, 2015

Credits: Producer, Cinematographer 


VICE News

VICE News is a 24-hour online international news organization. 

The Farmers Fighting Rural America's Mental Health Crisis

One night in 1992, farmer Jeff Ditzenberger walked into an abandoned house near his farm in Monroe, Wisconsin and lit it on fire. He had no intention of walking out alive. But as the walls caught fire around him, he changed his mind. And he walked out. - Aug. 18, 2018


Arkansas: The Worst Place to Rent in America

Arkansas is one of the worst places to be a renter in America. It is the only state in the US where tenants are treated as criminals for paying rent late, and landlords are not required by law to maintain their properties. - JUNE 24, 2014

Credits: Producer


Al Jazeera - Fault Lines

Fault Lines is Al Jazeera's premier investigative documentary series.

made in bangladesh

After deadly factory disasters, we investigate if retailers like Walmart know where their clothes are being made. - AUG. 26, 2013

Credits: Production Assistant


cross border killings

Fault Lines travels to the border town of Nogales - currently the nexus for this increasingly lawless law enforcement - to meet the Mexican families who have lost their young sons at the hands of US agents who many accuse of being immune from the law. - SEPT. 17, 2013

Credits: Production Assistant


america's hidden harvest

Fault Lines investigates how underage children are hired by US agriculture to help put food on America's tables. - OCT. 31, 2013

Credits: Production Assistant


america's infant mortality crisis

As healthcare spending continues to grow, Fault Lines examines why so many babies are dying in the US. - OCT. 14, 2013

Credits: Production Assistant


elderly incorporated

Fault Lines investigates the business of elderly care, and what happens when corporations put profits ahead of care. - SEPT. 20, 2013

Credits: Production Assistant